Art at the end of the day is a product. Maybe a different one, but if you are an artist you would like and would need to make a living out of your art. Regardless of where you’re trying to sell art -on your website, an online marketplace, pop-up gallery, or an art and craft fair, and want to sell more.

So here a compilation of 20 tips to help you in the process. If you have some, let is know at info@hinsa.eu

1. Know What You Aim For

If you are serious about selling your art, you should consider your target audience. Think about how you can best connect with it. You still can maintain your artistic essence. No need to create just to sell and fit the needs of the public, but it’s good to know, what they like. Maybe you can also create artwork with a clear commercial appeal that is more affordable and appealing to the masses. Or you can do both

2. CREATE WORK THAT RESPONDS TO THE MARKET

As an artist you should focus  on what you want your work to say and stand for. What is the story. It is though important to consider how that work will be received by the art market and what a collector might want.

So Rubensteen: “There are some collectors who want something decorative, and then there are others who aren’t looking for the aesthetically pleasing piece, they’re looking for something that has punch. It depends on what your intention is with your art over whether you will create art that fits the collector. If you’re trying to sell art, you should take that responsibility seriously.”

3.    FIND AND ENGAGE YOUR AUDIENCE

Being away physically from the audience does not mean, you have an excuse. Take the time to meet art lovers and discuss your work even online. Talk about the impact you believe it’s making, and ask how they see it. Art is a very emotional sale. It needs usually an emotional connection, without it – you can not make a transaction.

4.    BUILD A CLIENT BASE

Your customers want to feel a real interaction and connection to the piece and artist they are buying from, so talking to them only when there is a sales moment is not helpful.

5.    LEARN FROM YOUR PEARS

Comparing yourself to others may be tough and as you are a unique artist. It is also difficult, but your work is seen in relation. It is key to follow and connect with other artists, particularly those who work in the same medium or engage in similar themes as your work. So you can see the value of their work, which will determine your value as well. Check out post artwork value in the HINSA.blog.

6.    MARKET ONLINE

Start with having a great website. Easy to navigate – and reach out to you in case of interest. Showcase available works on your website. Today it is easier than ever to post your work online. Apps like Instagram make it easy to bring your work to a mass audience, while platforms like Artrepreneur, allow artists to sell original art online directly to consumers.

7.    DOCUMENT YOUR WORK PROPERLY

Photographing and representing your artwork professionally is important for any online business. Without the ability to feel a product, customers need to get the best sense of what they’re buying through clear and detailed images. Selling art online is no exception. We will be sharing soon an online training on making best in class photographies of your art, so follow us.

8. USE ART SELLING PLATFORMS

Find the platform you feel well at. Most platforms give more than 60-70% of the sale price to the artist. Check the list of online art sale platforms, without covering all:

 ArtPal 

 Amazon Art

 Etsy 

eBay’s art category 

 Artfinder 

 Artplode 

UGallery 

Saatchi Art 

Artnet leveraged partnerships with major auction houses and galleries, combined with news and event listings, to become a point of reference for contemporary art collectors.

Artsy isn’t open to individual artists but is worth looking into seeing if your gallery is open to listing your artwork on the site.

 Art Storefronts

OnlineGallery.art

VSUAL selling artprints online

Singulart

https://www.artspace.com

 Degree Art for fresh graduates

https://artplease.com/

Eyestorm

Eyestorm

Sedition Art video-digital

Rise Art  renting art

Lumas – photography

https://pictadesign.com/ Canvas Art prints

Instagram Shopping(opens in new tab)

9. USE CROWDFUNDING

Best Crowdfunding Sites to support your art projects

1. Kickstarter
2. IndiGoGo
3. GoFundMe

And HINSA.Art will launch shortly such platform as well.

9. TRY ART MARKETPLACES

1. Etsy approx 90% of sale price to artist
2. Folksy approx 90% of the sale price to the artist
3. Not On The High Street 75% of sale price to artist

10. CREATE YOUR OWN SHOP

1. Squarespace
2. Big Cartel
3. Shopify

11. JOIN PRINT ON DEMAND PLATFORMS

1. redbubble – average of 17% of sale price to artist
2. society6 – 10% of sale price + markup to artist
3. designbyhumans – $2.50-$6.50 for art print sales

Or join HINSA. which will sell limited edition art-based gifts by selected artists, and pays a 20% license fee to the artist, and donates a further 20% to the HINSA.art foundation, which will support art projects and artists.

12. If you are a Photographer, here the best Photography Sites

1. 500px – 60% of sale to artist
3. Adobe Stock – 20% – 60% of sale to artist
2. Dreamstime – 25% – 60% of sale to artist

13: CHECK THE TOP ONLINE CURATORS’ SITES

1. MoMa UK really quite good!
2. The Jealous Curator equal parts jealousy inducing & inspiring
3. Canvas Blog well curated online magazine by Saatchi Art

14. FOLLOW ART AUCTION SITES

1. The Saleroom
2. Artnet Auctions
3. Mutual Art

15. FIND YOUR NICHE AND DIFFERENCIATION AND CREATE YOUR BRAND

Find time separating your work into portfolios to present one singular homogenous type of work. If some pieces might be presented as one cohesive unit for an exhibition, then take some time to photograph that work and create a portfolio.

16. POSITION YOURSELF

  • Do you create and sell art under your own name, a pseudonym, or a brand name?
  • What’s your brand story? How much of your personal story will you tell?
  • Do you have a mission, values, or a cause that you want to communicate through your brand?
  • Outside of the art itself, what is the visual direction of the brand? What’s the tone of your communication?
  • What branding assets do you need? Even without graphic design skills, you can generate a logo with free tools.

Check our post on Art Branding

17. TELL THE STORY OF YOUR WORK

Collectors are more inclined to purchase work from an artist they feel the connection to. May be you’ve shared emotional details about your work, have a friendly and interesting personality or are adept at articulating the meaning behind your work.

“It’s a pleasure to work with artists who can articulate why their work is sellable. Being transparent is better than merely hoping it will sell,” says Rubensteen

18. FIND THE RIGHT PRICE TAG

There are several methods to price your artwork like in any other segment.

a.     Cost plus

Taking all fixed costs, variable costs, overhead costs (your monthly need to support yourself) + hourly wage – considering the time spent on an artwork and adding some mark up (profit)

(overhead costs + hourly wage) x (markup percentage) x (work time) = sale price

  • Comparison pricing

Researching other artists with similar artworks to yours to see how your type of work is selling in the market.  talking to industry members, such as gallery owners, art dealers and fellow artists who create work similar to yours. Call and ask galleries and stores that sell art for their price lists. Geographic Market. Do you sell locally, regionally, nationally or internationally? It doesn’t pay to look at what competitive artwork sells for in Bulgaria if you sell locally in Missouri.  Consider the Type and Style of Art. Oil paintings should be compared to other oil paintings. Abstract art should be compared to abstract art, not portraits. Sizes should also be similar as well as edition numbers. Match Your Accomplishments. Pay particular attention to artists who have a resume like yours.  People who have been in the industry the same amount of time as well as those of similar age, education or work experience.  

  • Take Commissions Into Account. 

Consider the revenue you would get after any commission fees instead of the retail price of the work. For example, a gallery may have a 50% commission, while work sold on a personal website may have no commission. The gallery price may be higher, yet the artist may receive less money than the sale from a personal site. 

Use the right negotiation strategy

If a client requests a lower price, don’t immediately drop your offer. Instead, ask the client to make a counteroffer. Offer payment in installments, Suggest a bundle – adding a second artwork at a joint better price per piece.  Leave the business talk separate from creating a connection between artists and buyers. But if you have no gallery maybe you can give the picture and suggest a talk later when the client has already experienced the picture in their homes.

19. WORK WITH GALLERIES

When working directly with a gallery, know that you’ll have to split the profits from any sales. Generally, the gallery will take about 50% of a work’s sale price. While it may seem crazy to give away half of your money, galleries will be able to get your work out to a larger audience than you’ll be able to reach on your own. They may also be able to sell a drawing that you would have sold out of your studio for $200 for $2,000, since they know their clients’ interests best, and can help lend credibility to your practice.

20. Enjoy what you do and try to find your own voice!

There are many other ideas around so check the net and learn.

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